Mid-South woman sues sheriff’s office over monkey - Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Mid-South woman sues sheriff’s office over monkey

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One of the three Capuchin monkeys Sharon Campbell owns, "grooming" Janice's hair. One of the three Capuchin monkeys Sharon Campbell owns, "grooming" Janice's hair.
Campbell used to own four capuchins.  Missing from her barrel of monkeys is Callie. Campbell used to own four capuchins. Missing from her barrel of monkeys is Callie.
Campbell bought Callie for her daughter, and they were inseparable until four years ago when Marshall County deputies showed up at her home with a court order to obtain Callie. Campbell bought Callie for her daughter, and they were inseparable until four years ago when Marshall County deputies showed up at her home with a court order to obtain Callie.
Marshall County Major David Cook says he has never heard of anyone else who has had to serve a replevin on a monkey. Marshall County Major David Cook says he has never heard of anyone else who has had to serve a replevin on a monkey.
HOLLY SPRINGS, MS -

(WMC-TV) – A Holly Springs woman filed a multi-million dollar lawsuit over a monkey, which happens to have a direct line to Hollywood royalty.

"These monkeys are like our family. When you get attached to them, it's hard to explain," said Sharon Campbell.

Campbell owns three Capuchin monkeys.  But, she used to own four.  Missing from her barrel of monkeys is Callie.

"Callie was six weeks old when I got her. She was a little bitty thing," said Campbell.

Campbell has owned monkeys her entire life. She bought Callie for her daughter, who was 14 at the time.

"This monkey slept, this monkey showered with my daughter. Anytime you see my daughter she was with this monkey," explained Campbell.

They were inseparable until four years ago when Marshall County deputies showed up at Campbell's home with something called a replevin, a court order to obtain property.

The property they were looking for – was Callie.

"Told me he'd handcuff me in front of my kids and call the welfare department to come get them if I didn't turn the monkey over," said Campbell.

It was a first for Marshall County Major David Cook.

"I have never personally, or know of anyone else, who has had to go and serve a replevin on a monkey," said Major Cook.

Investigators say two women, who lived out of state, claimed in court that they represented Callie's original owner. They said that Campbell still owed money for the monkey.

Once the women had Callie in their possession, they sold her to a family in Texas.

It turns out the women never had any claim to the Capuchin monkey.

Now, four years later, a judge has ordered that Callie's alleged kidnappers be arrested.

"The arrest warrants are for some type of fraud in reference to the court proceedings about the replevin and the possession, and some documents," said Major Cook.

Apparently, the documents presented in court were fake. And Campbell says the women had no ties to Callie's original owner.

Why would they go so far as to get this monkey?

"They were wanting the monkey before I got it," explained Campbell.

Callie is the offspring of Finster, the Capuchin who started in the 1994 movie "Monkey Trouble".

In the monkey world, getting the offspring of that monkey is like getting a foal from Secretariat.

Now, Sharon Campbell just wants Callie back.

She filed a $2 million lawsuit against the Marshall County Sheriff's Department for damages and what she says is the sheriff's reluctance to pursue the case.

With the monkey now on the sheriff's back, deputies are working with investigators in three other states to track down the two women, and the Capuchin, named Callie.

"To this day my daughter has a picture of that monkey on her night stand," said Campbell.

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