Suburban leaders plan next steps after judge's ruling - Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Suburban leaders plan next steps after judge's ruling

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MEMPHIS, TN -

(WMC-TV) - Suburban leaders are moving forward with plans to pursue other options in the fight to form their own schools system. They say they are disappointed but not defeated.

Suburban Shelby County residents were preparing for swearing-in ceremonies for the municipal school board members they elected November 6, but now those plans will have to be dropped.

"I think for the newly elected school board for Germantown this has to be a letdown. They've not been sworn in and now they won't be," said Germantown Mayor Sharon Goldsworthy.

The ruling from Judge Mays says the law allowing Suburban municipalities to create their own school systems violates the Tennessee Constitution.

Now, all attempts to form school districts in Arlington, Bartlett, Collierville, Germantown, Lakeland, and Millington are null and void.

Suburban leaders say they are currently reviewing their options.

"We certainly have the possibility of an appeal. We have the possibility of legislative relief in Nashville the beginning of next year. We have the possibility of some kind of municipal charter school systems," said Bartlett Mayor Keith McDonald.

"It just delays what we're planning right now but it doesn't stop the process. So that's one aspect. We know the constitutionality of what the judge is ruling right now is in question. There's legislation that may or may not happen, not only with municipal schools either, with charter districts or whatever," said Arlington Mayor Mike Wissman.

The fight is definitely not over.

Even with Mays' ruling, several suburban leaders say they will continue to pursue the municipal schools.

Copyright 2012 WMC-TV. All rights reserved.

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