Memphis remembers Dr. King on assassination anniversary - Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis remembers Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on assassination anniversary

Posted: Updated:
People gathered at the National Civil Rights Museum for the annual wreath-laying ceremony on the anniversary of Dr. Kings assassination. People gathered at the National Civil Rights Museum for the annual wreath-laying ceremony on the anniversary of Dr. Kings assassination.
A crowd of people, individuals and families, watched and reflected. A crowd of people, individuals and families, watched and reflected.
Members of Alpha Phi Alpha, Dr. King's college fraternity, walked in unison carrying another wreath. Members of Alpha Phi Alpha, Dr. King's college fraternity, walked in unison carrying another wreath.
Dr. Keith Norman with NAACP Memphis speaks during the ceremony. Dr. Keith Norman with NAACP Memphis speaks during the ceremony.
MEMPHIS, TN -

(WMC-TV) – On this day, 45 years ago, the world lost one of the most important civil rights leaders to walk the planet.

People gathered at the National Civil Rights Museum for the annual memorial ceremony for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a moving experience that included members of his family and his college fraternity.

"To stand in this place and to celebrate his legacy is the greatest honor to me," stated Dr. Keith Norman with NAACP Memphis.

A wreath is placed on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. died 45 years ago.  A crowd of people, individuals and families, watched and reflected.

"I wanted to be here because this is black history and I wanted to just pay my respects to the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.," said attendee Aaron Hinton.

"It's very somber which is fitting for the day," Lisa Ball said.

Members of Alpha Phi Alpha, Dr. King's college fraternity, walked in unison carrying another wreath.

"It's a moving experience," said fraternity member Barry-Lewis Harris.  "It's a telling testimony the fortitude.  It's actually the realization of a dream as we are actually still able to remember the life and legacy of the dream Martin gave to us. That we would keep it."

"He fought for our rights and after he did that it's better a whole lot of openness came along for all of us," Crystal Pendergrass said.

"I have hope the dream is still alive that our communities belong to us and we are in charge of making them better," Norman said.  "We can't wait for someone to come and deliver us."

Earlier today, the city renamed a street to honor the sanitation workers who went on strike in 1968.

The street's new name is ‘1968 Strikers Lane'.  That strike was the reason Dr. King came to Memphis.

Copyright 2013 WMC-TV. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow