Gallery honors the life of Medgar Evers - Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

Gallery honors the life of Medgar Evers

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The 50th celebration banquet is part of homecoming events sponsored by Charles Evers, the brother of Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers. The 50th celebration banquet is part of homecoming events sponsored by Charles Evers, the brother of Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers.
Volunteer service projects were held throughout the country in Evers' honor Saturday afternoon and Sunday. Volunteer service projects were held throughout the country in Evers' honor Saturday afternoon and Sunday.
JACKSON, MS -

(WMC-TV) - Throughout this weekend celebrations were planned in honor of the 50th anniversary of the assassination of Medgar Evers.

The Civil Rights Activist was shot dead by Ku Klux Klan member Byron De La Beckwith on June 12, 1963.

Sunday his widow attended the official ribbon cutting for the opening of the Medgar Evers Retrospective Gallery at Smith Robertson Museum.

The front porch of Medgar Wiley Evers' Decatur home greets visitors to his retrospective gallery. A glimpse into the life of the civil rights icon killed at the age of 37.

"This is kind of getting close to the day you know, just a couple of days away, emotions running pretty high. I'm a little bit surprised. But that's ok. It's ok to have tears 50 years after," said Medgar's widow, Myrlie Evers-Williams.

The NAACP Field Secretary's path to equality is traced in this collection from his early years of dreaming the vision to meeting wife Myrlie Beasley at Alcorn State University.

"I'm just so moved by quite honestly everything that they've been able to do. It's so important to our community, but for all the visitors who come to Jackson. They have a place to come and get a sense of what was and the future," Evers-Williams said.

And what was consists of images of the past, segregation and oppression.

The gallery contains photographs of the struggle for equality and the major role Evers' played in shaping the state's future.

"It's difficult for the family, but we were instructed by him I'll put it that way to give our all. Not to hate, which at times is very difficult not to do," Evers-Williams added.

But Mrs. Evers-Williams says her message for future generations is to move forward and make progress, not only for yourself, but for the entire community.

"Life does not end when one stops breathing," Evers-Williams added.

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