MED president encourages Haslam to expand Medicaid - Action News 5 - Memphis, Tennessee

MED president encourages Haslam to expand Medicaid

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Healthcare. gov was the brunt of a musical joke at the country music awards Wednesday night, but signing up for government mandated health insurance is no laughing matter in Memphis. Healthcare. gov was the brunt of a musical joke at the country music awards Wednesday night, but signing up for government mandated health insurance is no laughing matter in Memphis.
Outside the hospital, where 26 percent of the patients are uninsured, the state of Tennessee has put strict rules on who can help get people signed up. Outside the hospital, where 26 percent of the patients are uninsured, the state of Tennessee has put strict rules on who can help get people signed up.

(WMC-TV) - The Memphis Regional Center's president is encouraging the Tennessee Governor and state legislature to expand Medicaid in Tennessee, which will help offset the cost of uncompensated care.

Healthcare. gov was the brunt of a musical joke at the country music awards Wednesday night, but signing up for government mandated health insurance is no laughing matter in Memphis.

"We have to do a lot of education at the local level," said Memphis Mayor A C Wharton, who is concerned about the message he is hearing in parts of the community. "[I hear] 'Im not going to do anything,' 'If something happens I'll just go on to The Med as usual.' "

The MED is not being specific about exactly how the Affordable Care Act will impact the hospital and its patients. But the MED's president, Reginald W. Coopwood, released the following statement:

"Regional Medical Center, like all other healthcare organizations in the community, encourage individuals to explore insurance options available under the Affordable Care Act. We support all eligible individuals signing up for insurance through the exchange. Increased coverage is a positive thing for both patients and healthcare systems."

Outside the hospital, where 26 percent of the patients are uninsured, the state of Tennessee has put strict rules on who can help get people signed up.

"What the federal government said is, 'Well we're going to leave it up to the states as to how they do that.' Well we said because those folks, the navigators are getting a lot of private information we want to make certain they're doing what they should," said Haslam.

Enrollment counselors must undergo background checks and register with the state. Those who do not are subject to a $1,000 fine.

"We certainly have no intention of doing anything that would make enrollment harder," said Haslam.

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